Reviews

Marie Phillips: Gods behaving badly

gods-behaving-badlyAuthor: Marie Phillips
Genre: Fantasy/Fiction
Pages: +- 270
Stand alone

Ever wondered what would happen if the Greek gods did exist in this era? What would they do? How would they live? Would things be any different?
Then welcome to 21st century London, England.
With the gods fallen out of grace for some time now they can be found in one of the old houses in London, which they bought in the 17th century, back when they had money. The house is in a terrible state and even though Hephaestus is trying really hard to keep up with all the demands, it isn’t really working out.
But everything appears to change when Aphrodite wants revenge. With a mortal in the picture now, a cleaner, things seem to go different than first intended.

Meet the Gods behaving badly, staring: Apollo, Artemis, Aphrodite and two mortals named Neil and Alice.

This story starts quite interesting  because Artemis encounters something she had not expected. When she takes her usual walk around the park with some of the dogs, yes she is now a dog walker, she suddenly comes to a stop. There was something that shouldn’t be here, she noted. On a spot that before was empty, now stands a grown tree.
When Artemis starts to talk to the tree she finds out several things:
1. Apollo is a total ass (actually this is only, again, confirmed)
2. The tree is not actually a tree but an Australian woman who denied Apollo “his pleasure”

“Mortals aren’t going to be able to understand you, I’m afraid.” said Artemis. “Just gods. And other vegetation. I wouldn’t bother talking to the grass, though. It isn’t very bright.”

After she found out those two points, Artemis started for home right away. Back there another situation had come into existence, causing Aphrodite to want revenge on dear Apollo. After his vow to not harm any humans for at least ten years, or until he gets his power back, things really get started.
During a performance of Apollo for a TV-show, Eros (Aphrodite’s son) hits him with a love-arrow. At that point the god of the sun falls desperately in love with a mortal woman.
You may already have figured this out: Things just tend to go wrong when Apollo gets involved, at least in this book.

Yes, I admit: I didn’t really think this through.
When I first saw this book I thought: OMG WOW THIS IS AMAZING! GREEK GODS IN THE 21ST CENTURY?! *almost having trouble thinking clearly, nearly fainting etc*. This book had so much potential but, I think, it could have been written better.

Just let me explain myself here.
First of all I think the concept was really great and original. I haven’t read a book about gods in this time period so far and I was very curious about it. The first few chapters were all right, good way to get into the book as it were. But then things started to change for me.
It all went to fast to my opinion. The writer could have done so much more with this! But unfortunately when things started to get interesting there were skips in time or a shift of view (for instance from Artemis’ to Apollo’s point of view). It simply wasn’t all there for me.
Don’t understand me wrong, though.
The story was fun and it was a quick read because of the short chapters and the language was good to follow. The gods kept their attitudes and appearance in the story, there was even a flashback to an encounter some thousands of years ago between Eros and Apollo about a girl named Daphne. And even though Marie Phillips did a good job putting old gods into the modern era, it just missed that something, that little expansion that would have made this story awesome and worthy of a sequel.
However that didn’t happen.
And even though there were some points of action in the story, the same happened that I already mentioned above: something was missing for me.

To sum it up:
The book is very original, the story was funny and easy to follow but it could have been more in my opinion.
Because of that I’ll give this book three stars.

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